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Monday, June 19, 2006

More very small people likely to be condemned to death

Why do reporters generally fail to point out that screening - whether pre- or post-implantation - doesn't actually prevent children having diseases; it just gets them killed quicker.

The Telegraph has a rather inconsistent approach to this whole business. Compare this sympathetic report from a few weeks ago on mothers who do not abort their Downs Syndrome babies, and its associated editorial, which is admittedly a cop-out on the philosophical consistency front, but is a lot closer to a perception of reality than anything you'd find in other broadsheets.