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Thursday, February 09, 2006

Sacerdotium et Respublica


In my quest yesterday I came across an even nicer depiction of Germany. An earlier allegorical representation of Italia and Germania by the same artist (Philipp Veit) who painted the 1848 image of Germania I originally posted. It is interesting that Italy is shown as the Church and Germany as the Empire. In fact, the coats of arms beneath the feet of Germania are those of the seven Mediaeval electors not the nine or ten that were created after the 30 Years war and French Revolution respectively.